1. How to Catch a Foul Ball: Citi Field, At&T Field, Safeco Field - TIME →

  2. Except that MMS is far larger than all apps revenues.. yeah. That MMS. The ‘failed’ MMS that generated 31 Billion dollars in 2011 year according to Portio and is still growing. Far more than half of MMS is now media content not pictures by consumers. Media content like what? News. Video clips of TV shows. Ads. Movie trailers. Jokes. Offers. Tickets. So yeah. I don’t mean to stop developing your app strategy but please consider where the real money and profits are in mobile, except for games, they are not in apps. MMS works on over 85% of all phones in use on the planet, well past 3 times more than all smartphones in use.

    — Communities Dominate Brands: The Comprehensive App Economics Blog 2014 - Yes Peak App is apt name - Sheer disaster industry with only one sector making money

  3. SMS was worth 55 Billion dollars last year according to Juniper (more than twice the total revenues of smartphone apps) and is used in everything from news headlines to jokes to coupons to television voting to alerts to reminders to weblinks to security confimations.

    — Communities Dominate Brands: The Comprehensive App Economics Blog 2014 - Yes Peak App is apt name - Sheer disaster industry with only one sector making money

  4. Where should you develop? Good question. Answer is Android. Yes, iPhone too if you develop for the Industrialized World but not for the Emerging World. If you develop for the Emerging World then its Android and Java. Windows Phone is dead, Symbian is dead, bada is dead, Blackberry only lives in the enterprise.

    — Communities Dominate Brands: The Comprehensive App Economics Blog 2014 - Yes Peak App is apt name - Sheer disaster industry with only one sector making money

  5. You can see the dramatic difference. Gaming is quite a healthy app category, with plenty of profit potential. In fact the 10 biggest revenue-earning apps in 2013 were all games said App Annie. Most of the millionaires in apps are from gaming. But look at the opposite end on that table, the despair if you don’t do games or enterprise apps. Then its hopeless. 75% of apps are in this category of misery. And remember now, these are still averages, the median is always worse for these… If the median for all app developers was 400 dollars and the difference between game developers and the rest is this stark, the median income for the non-gaming developers must be under 100 dollars but I don’t have enough data to be able to calculate that at this point.

    — Communities Dominate Brands: The Comprehensive App Economics Blog 2014 - Yes Peak App is apt name - Sheer disaster industry with only one sector making money

  6. Its like in Las Vegas, the gamblers mostly lose, some win big, but the House Always Wins. This is like an unlicenced gambling operation run by the nice iFolks and gFolks for us, and poor saps run in with their wacky app ideas and 96% lose their shirts.. but the House Always Wins.

    — Communities Dominate Brands: The Comprehensive App Economics Blog 2014 - Yes Peak App is apt name - Sheer disaster industry with only one sector making money

  7. We just heard that most smartphone owners do not download even one app monthly. Why is that if the download numbers are so big and essentially all smartphone users do download apps. Its that we binge-download apps when the smartphone is brand new. We love the new phone, we want our fave apps onto it what we had before (or if its the first smartphone, what we may have been wanting to get) and thats when we also discover some other interesting apps. That happens in the first month of ownership. Then most smartphone users stop and the phone stays like that most of the way. There may be an occasional need to download something but we don’t go back to the store just to shop. We do that only when the smartphone is new. The next time we do that, is when we get our next smartphone.

    — Communities Dominate Brands: The Comprehensive App Economics Blog 2014 - Yes Peak App is apt name - Sheer disaster industry with only one sector making money

  8. When total developer-revenues (after Apple or Google has taken its cut) are divided by total apps in circulation, we get an average earned revenue of 5,250 US dollars per app that exists. Thats pretty pathetic when the average app development costs are about 25,000 dollars. When we remove the ‘zombie’ apps (ones that have been abandoned by their developer and aren’t updated anymore) then for currently supported ‘modern’ apps the average revenue per live app is $17,500.

    — Communities Dominate Brands: The Comprehensive App Economics Blog 2014 - Yes Peak App is apt name - Sheer disaster industry with only one sector making money

  9. 3.8% of smartphone app developers are able to turn some profit. Yes over 96% of smartphone app developers lose money on the project. Only 1.3% of developers have a hit product. This is essentially 10 times worse than normal hits businesses. Your chances of success are nearly as bad as 1 in 100. You are better off learning to rap or writing a book.

    — Communities Dominate Brands: The Comprehensive App Economics Blog 2014 - Yes Peak App is apt name - Sheer disaster industry with only one sector making money

  10. I won’t be protected. I will choose for myself what is ladylike and right. To shield me is an insult.

    — E.M. Forster Quotes (Author of A Room with a View)

  11. Expansion. That is the idea the novelist must cling to. Not completion. Not rounding off, but opening out.

    — Quote by E.M. Forster

  12. This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble.

    (Source: youtube.com)

  13. Outside views are often badges of seniority or achievement in the work world… But new evidence suggests employers should look at daylight exposure less as a mark of accomplishment and more as a matter of public health. So says an interdisciplinary team of architects and medical researchers that recently conducted a small case study comparing people exposed to natural light at their jobs with those who aren’t. The window workers scored better on common self-report health and sleep surveys; they also slept 46 minutes more a night, on average, as measured by a sleep monitor.

    — 

    Researchers find that windowless offices make workers lose sleep at night – which makes sense given how important daylight exposure is to regulating our internal clocks

    Ongoing coverage of sleep here.

    (via explore-blog)

  14. (Source: designeh)