1. (via Trill HD | RAS KASS on the origins of ” Nature of the Threat”)

  2. Medieval archers and pikemen needed to be able to distinguish friend from foe on the battlefield which necessitated some kind of wearable symbol. In an age without blueprints, color swatch books, or CNC embroiderers it was critical that the symbols be easy to fabricate within the humble confines of thatched roof cottages. Widespread Christianity made simple crosses a popular and practical motif which laid the groundwork for future combinations. (via Scotland Saves the Union Jack, a True Design Masterpiece | WIRED)

    Medieval archers and pikemen needed to be able to distinguish friend from foe on the battlefield which necessitated some kind of wearable symbol. In an age without blueprints, color swatch books, or CNC embroiderers it was critical that the symbols be easy to fabricate within the humble confines of thatched roof cottages. Widespread Christianity made simple crosses a popular and practical motif which laid the groundwork for future combinations. (via Scotland Saves the Union Jack, a True Design Masterpiece | WIRED)

  3. Ain’t no fun when the rabbit got the gun

    — Ras Kass – Write Where I Left Off Lyrics | Genius

  4. The automaker Smart (of teensy e-car fame) claims it has found a way to make 81 percent of pedestrians obey traffic signals. The trick: Make the “Do Not Cross” man gyrate, swing, and pump his arms like he was auditioning for Saturday Night Fever. The company carried out the experiment in public safety this summer in Lisbon. They first erected a mini-theater in a public square that allowed one person in at a time. Once inside, people were blasted with music and encouraged to cut their best rug. Motion-capturing cameras then translated their frenetic dancing in real time to the crosswalk signal, bringing amusement to many. (via How About a Crosswalk Light that Dances? - CityLab)

    The automaker Smart (of teensy e-car fame) claims it has found a way to make 81 percent of pedestrians obey traffic signals. The trick: Make the “Do Not Cross” man gyrate, swing, and pump his arms like he was auditioning for Saturday Night Fever. The company carried out the experiment in public safety this summer in Lisbon. They first erected a mini-theater in a public square that allowed one person in at a time. Once inside, people were blasted with music and encouraged to cut their best rug. Motion-capturing cameras then translated their frenetic dancing in real time to the crosswalk signal, bringing amusement to many. (via How About a Crosswalk Light that Dances? - CityLab)

  5. The problem isn’t coming up with ideas, it is how to contain the invasion. My ideas are like uninvited guests. They don’t knock on the door; they climb in through the windows like burglars who show up in the middle of the night and make a racket in the kitchen as they raid the fridge. I don’t sit and ponder which one I should deal with first. The one to be wrestled to the floor before all others is the one coming at me with the most vehemence.

    — Werner Herzog on creativity and how to turn your ideas into a reality (via explore-blog)

  6. mostlysignssomeportents:

Faith healing sign, Mr Toad’s Wild Ride, Disneyland on Flickr.

    mostlysignssomeportents:

    Faith healing sign, Mr Toad’s Wild Ride, Disneyland on Flickr.

  7. My curiosity is a defense mechanism. I am desperately trying to get back to my Cave where the surprises are scheduled. I have learned the faster I can learn about you, the faster I will figure out what you want, and that will tell me what motivates you, and when I know what motivates you, I will better understand how to communicate with you.

    — The Song of the Introvert – Rands in Repose

  8. You are high signal.

    — The Song of the Introvert – Rands in Repose

  9. You are chaos. You are disorder and confusion.

    I haven’t figured out an eye contact protocol with you yet, and I don’t know what you want so I don’t understand what motivates you so you are unpredictable. You are an unknown, which means you are full of surprises and surprises aren’t the spice of life, they are new data that don’t yet fit in my system and…

    I am addled with systems.

    — The Song of the Introvert – Rands in Repose

  10. engineeringhistory:

Sony TC-50 pocket cassette recorder for dictation, carried on NASA’s Apollo 10 mission, October 1968.

    engineeringhistory:

    Sony TC-50 pocket cassette recorder for dictation, carried on NASA’s Apollo 10 mission, October 1968.

  11. engineeringhistory:

N-K Data Systems circuit cards for digital converter and printer, circa 1960s.

    engineeringhistory:

    N-K Data Systems circuit cards for digital converter and printer, circa 1960s.

  12. The idea is to have a small appliance that can be easily taken apart and repaired by the user; in fact, the entire premise of the design right down to the visual appeal is to promote a culture of repair. The overall appearance is one of accessibility and takes away the high-tech intimidation factor. (via "Repair-Ware" Household Gadgets Designed To Last Forever With Easy Fixability : TreeHugger)

    The idea is to have a small appliance that can be easily taken apart and repaired by the user; in fact, the entire premise of the design right down to the visual appeal is to promote a culture of repair. The overall appearance is one of accessibility and takes away the high-tech intimidation factor. (via "Repair-Ware" Household Gadgets Designed To Last Forever With Easy Fixability : TreeHugger)

  13. There seems to be a misconception about what 3D printing does and does not enable. Does it allow us to delight a four-year-old by pulling a mini Darth Vader toy seemingly out of thin air? It does. But the object doesn’t materialize from nothing. A 3D printer consumes about 50 to 100 times more electrical energy than injection molding to make an item of the same weight. On top of that, the emissions from desktop 3D printers are similar to burning a cigarette or cooking on a gas or electric stove. And the material of choice for all this new stuff we’re clamoring to make is overwhelmingly plastic. In a sense, it’s a reverse environmental offset, counteracting recent legislation to reduce plastic use through grocery bag bans and packaging redesigns.

    — Yes We Can. But Should We? — re:form — Medium

  14. In Japanese culture, there is a word for this: chindogu. The literal translation is “weird tool,” but the concept is about utility, or lack thereof. Kenji Kawakami coined the term as a way to point out objects that are invented under the premise of solving a problem, but which, in practice, only generate more problems, rendering them devoid of utility. Kawakami humorously calls them “unuseless,” which is to say, they have a function, it’s just not one that helps us (and it may be one that harms us). (via Yes We Can. But Should We? — re:form — Medium)

    In Japanese culture, there is a word for this: chindogu. The literal translation is “weird tool,” but the concept is about utility, or lack thereof. Kenji Kawakami coined the term as a way to point out objects that are invented under the premise of solving a problem, but which, in practice, only generate more problems, rendering them devoid of utility. Kawakami humorously calls them “unuseless,” which is to say, they have a function, it’s just not one that helps us (and it may be one that harms us). (via Yes We Can. But Should We? — re:form — Medium)

  15. We found a trend: 85 percent of the shelters we surveyed say they’re working directly with victims whose abusers tracked them using GPS. Seventy-five percent say they’re working with victims whose abusers eavesdropped on their conversation remotely — using hidden mobile apps. And nearly half the shelters we surveyed have a policy against using Facebook on premises, because they are concerned a stalker can pinpoint location.

    — Smartphones Are Used To Stalk, Control Domestic Abuse Victims : All Tech Considered : NPR