1. Tim Berners-Lee’s invention of the URL was a brilliant generalisation that means we can refer to anything, anywhere. But it has had a few problems over time. The original “Cool URLs don’t change” has given way to Tim’s “eventually every URL ends up as a porn site”.

    — Epeus’ epigone: Fragmentions - linking to any text

  2. There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere.

    — Quotes : Adafruit Industries, Unique & fun DIY electronics and kits

  3. Any path that narrows future possibilities may become a lethal trap.

    — Quotes : Adafruit Industries, Unique & fun DIY electronics and kits

  4. Online, he becomes not just a meme but a whole branching forest of memes; he becomes the subject of that unique-to-the-Internet kind of love that’s essentially indistinguishable from hatred. People Photoshop him onto everything. Picolas Cage becomes a thing that exists.

    — Irrational Treasure «

  5. However, the further our respondents thought that Ukraine was from its actual location, the more they wanted the U.S. to intervene militarily. Even controlling for a series of demographic characteristics and participants’ general foreign policy attitudes, we found that the less accurate our participants were, the more they wanted the U.S. to use force, the greater the threat they saw Russia as posing to U.S. interests, and the more they thought that using force would advance U.S. national security interests; all of these effects are statistically significant at a 95 percent confidence level. Our results are clear, but also somewhat disconcerting: The less people know about where Ukraine is located on a map, the more they want the U.S. to intervene militarily.

    — The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene

  6. Where’s Ukraine? Each dot depicts the location where a U.S. survey respondent situated Ukraine; the dots are colored based on how far removed they are from the actual country, with the most accurate responses in red and the least accurate ones in blue. (via The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene)

    Where’s Ukraine? Each dot depicts the location where a U.S. survey respondent situated Ukraine; the dots are colored based on how far removed they are from the actual country, with the most accurate responses in red and the least accurate ones in blue. (via The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene)

  7. 11 April 2014

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    tiffehr

    tiffehr:

Looking at the Web with Internet Explorer 6, one last time | Ars Technica

    tiffehr:

    Looking at the Web with Internet Explorer 6, one last time | Ars Technica

  8. An interesting side effect of writing side project code every day is that your current task is frequently running in the back of your mind. Thus when I go for a walk, or take a shower, or any of the other non-brain-using activities I participate in, I’m thinking about what I’m going to be coding later and finding a good way to solve that problem

    — John Resig - Write Code Every Day

  9. …Bush painted his portraits, not just from photographs–a common enough practice as well as a long-established conceptual strategy, though I think only the former pertains here–but from the top search result on Google Images. Many photos were taken from the subject’s Wikipedia entry. Bush based his paintings on the literally first-to-surface, easiest-to-find photos of his subjects. (via George W. Bush Sourced All His Paintings From Google - ANIMAL)

    …Bush painted his portraits, not just from photographs–a common enough practice as well as a long-established conceptual strategy, though I think only the former pertains here–but from the top search result on Google Images. Many photos were taken from the subject’s Wikipedia entry. Bush based his paintings on the literally first-to-surface, easiest-to-find photos of his subjects. (via George W. Bush Sourced All His Paintings From Google - ANIMAL)

  10. It seems simple, but if you give homeless people homes, they’re not homeless people anymore. Salt Lake City and Phoenix have managed to almost completely eliminate homelessness among veterans in their cities using programs based on this premise. Those unmoved by such proposals on principle might find the bottom line more attractive: a study out of Los Angeles found that free housing cost about $600 a month per homeless person, compared to the $2,900 a month spent on providing services for people living on the street.

    — Let Them Eat Code | Dissent Magazine

  11. In the 19th century, when Michael Faraday passed a wire through a coil and essentially discovered electromagnetism, the legend goes, a congressman in charge of public funding for the sciences questioned the discovery’s importance: You got a needle to move, so what? Faraday’s supposed reply has become a kind of academic lore: “I don’t know of what use this will be, but one day you will tax it.”

    — Killing Pigs and Weed Maps: The Mostly Unread World of Academic Papers - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society

  12. According to StatCounter close to 50 percent of desktop PCs currently in use in China run Windows XP.

    — China Hangs On to a Dying Windows XP

  13. 7 things I Wish Every Search Box Did | Inside Intercom →

  14. The garments are made of leather and opaque smart e-foils, which are wired with electronics and LEDs. As the wearer’s heartbeat quickens, as a result of “close and personal encounters” with people, the garment becomes more and more sheer, until it turns completely transparent. (via This dress becomes transparent when it detects you’re turned on)

    The garments are made of leather and opaque smart e-foils, which are wired with electronics and LEDs. As the wearer’s heartbeat quickens, as a result of “close and personal encounters” with people, the garment becomes more and more sheer, until it turns completely transparent. (via This dress becomes transparent when it detects you’re turned on)

  15. (via Last year, 71 million people watched other people play video games - Quartz)

    (via Last year, 71 million people watched other people play video games - Quartz)